Coriander

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My little coriander patch has reached maturity and now needs to be pulled up before the early summer heat hits. I’ve been eating a fair bit of it over the last few months but it will bolt to seed soon. I save the seed for growing my next batch of coriander as well to use the seeds as a spice in the kitchen. Before this bolts I’ll be making a batch of my dad’s infamous chimichurri.

Chimichurri recipe

Bunch of coriander
Bunch of parsley
Bunch of spring onions
Fresh chopped chillies (to taste)
1 head of garlic, half crushed, other half sliced finely
30 grams dried Italian herbs
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
Extra virgin olive oil
Chop the coriander, parsley, spring onions and chilli finely with a really sharp kitchen knife. Mix together. Mix in the crushed and sliced garlic. Add just enough extra virgin olive oil to cover the mix. Store in a tightly sealed glass container in the fridge.

Silverbeet

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Picking the silverbeet the other day I realised that I’m self sufficient in it. I’m not sure exactly how long I’ve been saving the seed but it’s been at least four years. The seed originally came from a Diggers punnet. I noticed that it grew exceptionally well in my garden and so I let it go to seed. After that, it just kept popping up by itself in the same patch and has naturalised in that spot.

This patch above is in different spot in my garden and is growing in full sun. It also gets hammered by the hot westerly afternoon sun. This photo was taken the morning after a 40+C degree day and it’s looking pretty happy to me. That day it was over 40C again and around 7pm it was still looking pretty perky. Three days into the heatwave and it’s handling it like a boss.

It’s sweet, tasty, hardly needs any water and is very slow to bolt to seed. If any does bolt after this heatwave I’ll pull it out so that characteristic isn’t passed on to the next generation. I feel a great need to continue to save this seed and keep this little plant going. It can be cropped for months on end by picking the large outer leaves as needed which makes it a highly productive space saving addition to my kitchen garden.

Seed saving

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Q: What’s wrong with this photo?

A: There are no seeds where they should be.

We need to always have the ability to save our seeds, seeds belong to the global commons, not to a handful of corporations. Best case scenario this was a hybrid, worst case it was genetically modified this way. In the words of Vandana Shiva ‘practice civil disobedience and save your seeds. It’s the difference between scarcity and abundance, war and peace.’