Macadamia mylk

MYLK

It’s a moment that I chase everyday while growing and foraging my own food. It’s the moment my mind is blown by the flavour of what I’m eating. I had one of these moments drinking some homemade macadamia mylk. I’m sure it was because the macadamia nuts were so fresh. They dropped off the tree a week ago and were cracked open to make this recipe.

Macadamia mylk recipe

1/2 cup raw macadamia nuts

water for soaking

500ml water

pinch of salt (optional)

1 medjool date, take out pip (optional)

  1. Crack open nuts. Rinse the nuts well to make sure they are clean. Soak in water for 2 hours make sure they are covered well and there is some space for them to expand a little. Take nuts out of the soaking water, drain and rinse well. Discard soaking water.
  2. Blend nuts and 500ml fresh water for one minute, I use a nutribullet. There’s no need to strain when finished. Bottle and keep in the fridge.
  3. If you want a sweeter mylk add the medjool date and include when doing step 2 above.

Harvesting macadamia nuts

macadamsia-nuts

Macadamia nuts are the queen of nuts and I love them. I have wonderful memories of whiling away the hours cracking nuts from the tree in my backyard. I used to gather up the nuts and crack them and eat fresh or add into pesto. Any that were crushed too much in the cracking process were fed to my chickens who absolutely loved them. These chickens were spoilt as at the time I worked on a blueberry farm and used to bring home the blueberries with the caterpillars in them. They would gobble them up as quickly as they could. They had the shiniest coats and were incredibly healthy. They laid the nicest eggs I think I will ever eat ever again.

Moving to Adelaide I lamented the loss of living in a subtropical zone. More so for the loss of knowledge of plants. When I looked at the landscape then I could read it like a book. Its plants were like characters where the names, history and relationships were known. It was a happy day when I found out Macadamia’s grew on the Adelaide Plains and even better when I found a few growing on public land. Macadamia trees are a good contender for a guerilla gardening plant and would be cheirshed by other foragers for many years to come.

The nuts start dropping to the ground from late March to September. In the lead up to the season the tree will start dropping baby nuts and some mature nuts. The nut needs to be taken out of the husk as soon as possible so it doesn’t get damaged. You don’t need to cut the husk, just wait for the green husk to split open then remove. I put them in a basket in a warm spot to speed up the husk splitting open.

Put them back in the basket in the warm spot until they rattle around inside the shell and then they’re ready to crack open. Use a hammer to crack the nut open on a surface with a little indentation so the nut doesn’t roll away while cracking. If you have a regular steady supply then it would be worth investing in a purpose built macadamia nut cracker.